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View Full Version : Elvis in the 70's v.s. other artists



Brian
09-14-2008, 10:12 PM
Hi everyone

Sony BMG released the Box set Walk a Mile in my Shoes a collection of Elvis 70's music and I was wondering where you all would rank his music from this era against the other artists of the time period?
Reading an editorial review of the 70's box set it says that while Elvis music in the 70's didn't match Al Greene,Neil Young or Van Morrison it does stack up well against Bob Dylan and the ex-beatles in the same decade. In a way I agree with that and in a way i don't because While I will concede that Al Greene, Neil Young and Van Morrison were popular during this time I don't really like them. I look at Elvis 70's music in this way: Elvis made 4 good albums in the 70's On Stage, Elvis country,TTWII and he touched me, I think On Stage is Elvis best live album and one with sort of a concept because Elvis is doing an album full of contemporary covers. TTWII is a ballad album with Elvis singing more grown up ballads and love songs than he had in the
50's and 60's. Elvis country is a good album that is actually a concept album with fine musicianship from the TCB band while He Touched Me finds Elvis doing gospel again and doing it well. Also in the 70's I thought Elvis recorded a mediocre second Christmas album and an okay Country album in Today.
The singles Elvis released started off good with the Wonder of You a good song if a little bombastic then followed in 71 by something different in the song i'm leavin and then Elvis doing Seperate Ways, Burning love in 72 and the funky blues Steamroller blues in 73,I got a thing about you and Promised Land in 1974 and T-R-O-U-B-L-E in 1975. All good singles imo but the singles I didn't think were good and shouldn't have been released were Elvis cover of You don't have to say you love me, There goes me Everything, Rags to riches, life, Way down, these songs were weak and uncommercial imo.
I think when people put down Elvis music in the 70's it has to do with Elvis perceived image at the time and not the music itself because when you play these songs for most people their reaction is like Wow! I didn't know Elvis recorded this song or that song. My thoughts on Elvis 70's music is that it may not be the best of what anyone else was doing at the time but the material he recorded was alright when taken as a whole. A reason I think Elvis music wasn't more commercial was because he didn't seem to fit in with the music of the time as the popular radio hits were ''I Think I love you'', ''Tie a yellow Ribbon'',''The Night the lights went out in Georgia'',''Jungle Boogie'', ''If Loving you is Wrong'' etc. I can't see Elvis doing any of these songs and when you look at a song like ''I got a thing about you baby'' that I thought should have been a huge hit record the other big hits were ''Don't rock the boat'', ''Billy Don't be a hero'' and ''Dark lady'', I got a thing was a great record but didn't have a place on the radio alongside those other songs. I agree that Elvis 70's music stacks up well against Bob Dylan's 70's music or the Ex Beatles 70's music although Elvis never made an album like All things must pass, Blood on the Tracks or Band on the Run. How do all of you think Elvis music stacks up against all the popular music artists of the 70's?
Was Elvis music as good as the music of Al Greene, Van Morrison,Neil Young, Elton John, James Taylor, Paul McCartney,The Eagles and The Carpenters?
What do you think of Elvis music in the 70's compared to RCA's two big recording artists of the time David Bowie and John Denver?
Elvis 70's music gets comparisons to Neil Diamond and Tom Jones what do you think of the music compared between the 3 of the them?
Elvis recorded quite a bit of country material in the 70's how do you think it compares to Waylon Jennings, Bobby Bare, Dolly Parton,Conway Twitty,Willie Nelson and Charley Pride? etc.

I thought forward to getting everyone's thoughts on this and I hope to get a lot of replies for this thread.

hounddog
09-14-2008, 11:05 PM
I was just thinking about Elvis doing the Cher song Dark Lady.

It's very hard to compare Elvis to Bowie. 70's Bowie was experimental, though i could hear Elvis do Space Oddity. Also songs like Heartache Tonight and Desperado by the Eagles. But like the other artist you mentioned bare Tom they all wrote some of their songs. Elvis was stuck with the system in place, good or bad of sourcing material to record.

"Elvis never made an album like All things must pass, Blood on the Tracks or Band on the Run. How do all of you think Elvis music stacks up against all the popular music artists of the 70's"

That's true but All things must pass was is a triple album and a bit like an extension of the Sgt. Peppers album and much more esoteric than any other album I can think of. Band on The Run is more rock from my memory of it, he did make Elvis Country which i think stacks up real well against other country artist from the 70's Elvis was recrodring a lot of songs with a country fell in the 70's if you look at his last album Moody Blue i think it is one cool album and certainly outdoes some of Tom Jones releases.

In some ways you can't really compare Elvis to Diamond, McCartney or Harrison as they all were composer as well. But Tom Jones yes he's an intreperter of songs like Elvis.

I have a few of Tom's albums and he did do more R&B than Elvis in the 70's but on the whole I think over time the way Elvis laid the tracks down they haven't aged the same way that some of Tom's songs have.

rocknroll
09-15-2008, 09:27 AM
Elvis' work and chart success just from 1970 to 1977, taken alone, is enough to garner hall of fame consideration.

Brian
09-15-2008, 03:59 PM
"Elvis never made an album like All things must pass, Blood on the Tracks or Band on the Run. How do all of you think Elvis music stacks up against all the popular music artists of the 70's"

That's true but All things must pass was is a triple album and a bit like an extension of the Sgt. Peppers album and much more esoteric than any other album I can think of. Band on The Run is more rock from my memory of it, he did make Elvis Country which i think stacks up real well against other country artist from the 70's Elvis was recrodring a lot of songs with a country fell in the 70's if you look at his last album Moody Blue i think it is one cool album and certainly outdoes some of Tom Jones releases.

In some ways you can't really compare Elvis to Diamond, McCartney or Harrison as they all were composer as well. But Tom Jones yes he's an intreperter of songs like Elvis.



Hi hounddog

I think when comparing Elvis with the ex-beatles I would say that John Lennon didn't really make any good albums like the other beatles did imo I like his song Mind Games and his cover of Stand by me but that's it.
Paul McCartney solo career is uneven and I think he came out with some weak albums and singles. As for George Harrison I don't think he ever topped All things must Pass and Ringo while coming out with some good music and selling a lot of records during this time I would put Elvis ahead of him.

A lot of people say Elvis and Neil Diamond's music are alike and comparable because they both did a lot of ballads in the 70's.

rickb
09-15-2008, 05:55 PM
Elvis' 70s output was consistently strong and stands up particularly well today in comparision to a lot of the trendy pop hitmakers of the time.
He should have done more rock material and less country ballads (IMO) but he released many excellent singles and there are many `hidden gem's on his albums too

Jumpsuit Junkie
09-16-2008, 06:06 AM
The problem with the 70's music catalogue in a nutshell for Elvis is poor music direction from those around him. Elvis made some hideous choices due to the fact everyone wanted a share of the profits.

I don't doubt there are a number of song selections made that Elvis personally liked, however for me there is a difference in singing something you like and a style which suits you.

Why was Elvis recording tracks such as "Three Corn Patches" when only six months prior he was broadcasting live around the world to millions of people?
Tracks like "Raised On Rock" and "I've Got A Thing About You Baby" were recorded at Stax at the same time!

As for the December sessions at stax, I'm sorry I only like a handful, the rest is just not my cup of tea...

"There's a Honkey Tonk Angel" and "Love Song Of The Year" would have me reaching for sleeping pills :doh:

I suppose it's all selective :hmm:

Brian
09-16-2008, 09:09 AM
Hello Mr. Jumpsuit Junkie

you sound like you like the 50's music the best as a body of work. I do as well.

I think there were some missed opportunities in the 70's for example

I think given the number of country songs Elvis recorded over the years he should have made some blues albums in the 70's consisting of blues standards
I think if he would of recorded more blues he'd be in the blues music hall of fame. Also the stax sessions yielded some good songs but overall they were a dissapointment to me because with the great band he had and the stax songwriting staff he could have got them to write him some funky stax R&B but he didn't do it. Their were other songwriters Elvis never recorded song from and one that springs is Jimmy Webb I think Elvis should have got him to write him an entire album. Elvis refused to record anything in 1974 or 77 that would have given us more sessions to talk about. One more thing instead of recording at Graceland for Feburary of 76 he should of gone to Hi Studio's to record a soul album with Willie Mitchell.

of course none of this happened but I still think Elvis 70's music is okay many fans like Elvis 70's music more than from any other decade.

Brian
09-17-2008, 02:46 PM
Does anyone here like Elvis 70's music. Does anybody have any opinions about Elvis 70's music?

I thought this topic would get more reponses than what it has gotten.

hounddog
09-17-2008, 03:19 PM
i really like Elvis' 70's music, the 1970 session where Elvis country was recorded i especially like. I love his version of I washed my hands in Muddy water, Just Pretend, Whole Lotta shaking. Songs like Polk Salad Annie, Patch It Up are rock standout for me. There are some songs that should have been hits, It's only love, I'm Leavin, I've got a thing about you baby, Never Been to Spain for example.

I was born in 1970 so for me this is the Elvis music i was listening to as well as older songs on the various comps that were available in Australia.

But i grew up on TTWII, Elvis Country, Elvis in the 70's (great Aussie comp LP).

KPM
09-17-2008, 03:22 PM
The problem with the 70's music catalogue in a nutshell for Elvis is poor music direction from those around him. Elvis made some hideous choices due to the fact everyone wanted a share of the profits.

I don't doubt there are a number of song selections made that Elvis personally liked, however for me there is a difference in singing something you like and a style which suits you.

Why was Elvis recording tracks such as "Three Corn Patches" when only six months prior he was broadcasting live around the world to millions of people?
Tracks like "Raised On Rock" and "I've Got A Thing About You Baby" were recorded at Stax at the same time!

As for the December sessions at stax, I'm sorry I only like a handful, the rest is just not my cup of tea...

"There's a Honkey Tonk Angel" and "Love Song Of The Year" would have me reaching for sleeping pills :doh:

I suppose it's all selective :hmm:
I actually like 3 Corn Patches and Honkey Tonk Angel, the latter gets played a lot on a local digital jukebox at a small dive my brothers and I go to on occasion. But the crowd is mainly the country music or country rock type crowd.
I think Elvis needed on occasion "strong independent producers on his sessions- with no strings attached" as to the source of new music. Just a new driving creative spark in the process of recording would have done wonders IMO. The 69 sessions were good because Elvis wanted to get serious again but also because of that spark from the studio and independent producer Chips Moman.

Unchained Melody
09-19-2008, 11:11 PM
"There's a Honkey Tonk Angel" and "Love Song Of The Year" would have me reaching for sleeping pills


Interesting observation of the two songs Matt lol, I say they are two of my favorites though :blush::blush:(y)

Jumpsuit Junkie
09-20-2008, 02:46 AM
Hello Mr. Jumpsuit Junkie

you sound like you like the 50's music the best as a body of work.

Not necessarily, I like each decade for different reasons, there is a mixed bag from each, for example I really don't like 'Heartbreak Hotel' even though it is a classic song which many casual fans consider a signature song.

I find that about 50% of the 70's songs are just not my cup of tea :supriced:

Hot List

Always On My Mind
Steamroller Blues
Raised On Rock
I've Got A Think About You Baby
If You Talk In Your Sleep
Promised Land
T-R-O-U-B-L-E
Hurt
For The Heart
Moody Blue
Way Down
Pledging My Love
Twenty Days and Twenty Nights
Bridge Over Trouble Water
Stranger In The Crowd
Mary In The Morning
Just Pretend
Funny How Time Slips Away
Whole Lot-Ta Shakin' Goin' On
Amazing Grace
The Wonder Of You
I've Lost You
The Next Step Is Love
You Don't Have to Say You Love Me
Patch It Up
I'm Leavin
It's Only Love
The Sound Of Your Cry
I Just Can't He;p bellievin'
How The Web Was Woven
An American Trilogy
Burning Love
It's A Matter Of Time
Separate Ways

Live

CC Rider
Polk Salad Annie
Proud Mary
Never Been To Spain
You Gave Me A Mountain
A Big Hunk 'O' Love
The Impossible Dream
Suspicious Minds
Unchained Melody
That's Alright
Until it's Time For You To Go
You've lost That lovin Feelin
Love Me
Reconsider Baby
I'll Remember you
For The Good Times
American Trilogy
I Can't Stop Loving You


Basically anything from 1970 is cool, after that it becomes a more selective process as the years go by!

There are more but these are on my ipod and get listened to.



I think there were some missed opportunities in the 70's

Aint that the truth, for me the more medication Elvis got involved in, the more personal the song selection became, now that is ok for the die hard fan and perhaps some occasional fans, however it isn't what I would term as popular...... although I know that statement is subjective


Interesting observation of the two songs Matt lol, I say they are two of my favorites though :blush::blush:(y)

Haha, it's all subjective Brad, as the old saying goes.. 'One man's meat is another man's poisen' :lmfao:

Unchained Melody
09-20-2008, 08:54 AM
Aint that the truth, for me the more medication Elvis got involved in, the more personal the song selection became, now that is ok for the die hard fan and perhaps some occasional fans, however it isn't what I would term as popular...... although I know that statement is subjective

Haha, it's all subjective Brad, as the old saying goes.. 'One man's meat is another man's poisen' :lmfao:

I definitley agree with that Matt.

Look at the song selections for his last album Moody Blue and EP BLVD, almost all the songs are about heartaches, lost love, very depressing stuff.

MojoElvis
09-20-2008, 10:28 AM
I was just thinking about Elvis doing the Cher song Dark Lady.

It's very hard to compare Elvis to Bowie. 70's Bowie was experimental, though i could hear Elvis do Space Oddity. Also songs like Heartache Tonight and Desperado by the Eagles. But like the other artist you mentioned bare Tom they all wrote some of their songs. Elvis was stuck with the system in place, good or bad of sourcing material to record.

"Elvis never made an album like All things must pass, Blood on the Tracks or Band on the Run. How do all of you think Elvis music stacks up against all the popular music artists of the 70's"

That's true but All things must pass was is a triple album and a bit like an extension of the Sgt. Peppers album and much more esoteric than any other album I can think of. Band on The Run is more rock from my memory of it, he did make Elvis Country which i think stacks up real well against other country artist from the 70's Elvis was recrodring a lot of songs with a country fell in the 70's if you look at his last album Moody Blue i think it is one cool album and certainly outdoes some of Tom Jones releases.

In some ways you can't really compare Elvis to Diamond, McCartney or Harrison as they all were composer as well. But Tom Jones yes he's an intreperter of songs like Elvis.

I have a few of Tom's albums and he did do more R&B than Elvis in the 70's but on the whole I think over time the way Elvis laid the tracks down they haven't aged the same way that some of Tom's songs have.

I always thought that,Cher tried to imitate Elvis' style. I think Elvis was in a class of his own at this point. There really was no comparison cause Elvis had reached, Legendary level.
Music wise, I think he missed out on a lot of good songs cause of his publishing company taking over 60% of the rights. I remember reading a story where Marty Lacker had to call people to get the credits for In The Ghetto, put on the label.
Suspicious Minds, made a good impression cept for the fade out/fade back in ending.

Unchained Melody
09-20-2008, 10:37 AM
I always thought that,Cher tried to imitate Elvis' style. I think Elvis was in a class of his own at this point. There really was no comparison cause Elvis had reached, Legendary level.
Music wise, I think he missed out on a lot of good songs cause of his publishing company taking over 60% of the rights. I remember reading a story where Marty Lacker had to call people to get the credits for In The Ghetto, put on the label.
Suspicious Minds, made a good impression cept for the fade out/fade back in ending.

The Elvis special from 2002 hosted by Chris Isaks has a Cher performance in it, she sings Jailhouse Rock. She's a fan no doubt about it.

KPM
09-20-2008, 03:25 PM
[QUOTE=Jumpsuit Junkie;246912]

.... for me the more medication Elvis got involved in, the more personal the song selection became, now that is ok for the die hard fan and perhaps some occasional fans, however it isn't what I would term as popular...... although I know that statement is subjective...[QUOTE]


Thats how I see it also, I think the mental state he was in and the medication to try and "combat" that state just made his song choices more personal, more introspective. He had to relate in some way that drew him to those songs. Perhaps thats why he did not want to record an upbeat rocker like "Burning Love" it was just not what he was feeling.

medleyofcostumes
09-24-2008, 06:01 AM
I am a 100% Elvis 70's fan - I seldom listen to Elvis' albums prior to 1968 but to be honest and agreeing with Jumpsuit Junkie, Elvis' choice of material to record (or somebody else's choice) included lots of lemons. which I also like for the simple reason that Elvis sings them. This is not a good criteria for judging a song. Trying to be objetive , important artists in the 70's recorded better songs over all. (I'm not judging the interpretation - just the quality of the songs) Imagine Elton John, Frank Sinatra, Queen recording 'Three Corn Patches' 'I Miss You' or 'Pledging my love' 20 years after it was originally released! Would you say it was a good song?

From a fan of EP in the 70's it sounds contradictory to say this but artistically it could have been better for Elvis to record fewer songs of a better caliber. Instead of releasing 'Raised on rock' 'Good Times' and 'Promised Land', RCA / Tom Parker could have released 1 album with 14 outstanding tracks, but not three hotchpodge albums.

I think that listening, choosing, rehearsing and recording 3 or 4 songs a night for say a week, does not allow for excellent results.

Unfortunately, IMO, Elvis started losing credibility, not with the fans obviously, when Parker turned Elvis into a mass production machine - lots of mediocre films with lots of mediocre songs so much so that the great songs of the 60's went by unrecognised for many music lovers in general.

The same thing happened in the 70's. After TTWII, On Tour and Aloha, the people around Elvis and maybe Elvis himself thought that whatever the man did, it would sell. Record sales figures show that Elvis record sales in the 70's were in decline, chart positions dropping with each release and the reasons apart from poor marketing strategies (over confidence, complacency) were the inclusion of a number of subtandard tracks. Certain songs, though good, were not contemporary enough and sounded dated - 'Pledging my love', 'He'll have to go', 'She wears my ring', 'Spanish eyes', 'Geen Green Grass of home'.

I think that every artist, no matter how big he/she is, must prove him/herself with every album release, every show, everything he/she does. There is no room for complacency.

KPM
09-24-2008, 09:45 AM
I am a 100% Elvis 70's fan - I seldom listen to Elvis' albums prior to 1968 but to be honest and agreeing with Jumpsuit Junkie, Elvis' choice of material to record (or somebody else's choice) included lots of lemons. which I also like for the simple reason that Elvis sings them. This is not a good criteria for judging a song. Trying to be objetive , important artists in the 70's recorded better songs over all. (I'm not judging the interpretation - just the quality of the songs) Imagine Elton John, Frank Sinatra, Queen recording 'Three Corn Patches' 'I Miss You' or 'Pledging my love' 20 years after it was originally released! Would you say it was a good song?

From a fan of EP in the 70's it sounds contradictory to say this but artistically it could have been better for Elvis to record fewer songs of a better caliber. Instead of releasing 'Raised on rock' 'Good Times' and 'Promised Land', RCA / Tom Parker could have released 1 album with 14 outstanding tracks, but not three hotchpodge albums.

I think that listening, choosing, rehearsing and recording 3 or 4 songs a night for say a week, does not allow for excellent results.

Unfortunately, IMO, Elvis started losing credibility, not with the fans obviously, when Parker turned Elvis into a mass production machine - lots of mediocre films with lots of mediocre songs so much so that the great songs of the 60's went by unrecognised for many music lovers in general.

The same thing happened in the 70's. After TTWII, On Tour and Aloha, the people around Elvis and maybe Elvis himself thought that whatever the man did, it would sell. Record sales figures show that Elvis record sales in the 70's were in decline, chart positions dropping with each release and the reasons apart from poor marketing strategies (over confidence, complacency) were the inclusion of a number of subtandard tracks. Certain songs, though good, were not contemporary enough and sounded dated - 'Pledging my love', 'He'll have to go', 'She wears my ring', 'Spanish eyes', 'Geen Green Grass of home'.

I think that every artist, no matter how big he/she is, must prove him/herself with every album release, every show, everything he/she does. There is no room for complacency.
Actually that had happened long before the 70s-Col. Parker use to brag that there were a large enough group of hard core fans that Elvis would always sell a couple hundred thousand of any release, and that they would go to the movies. Which back then 200,000 for a run of the mill performer or group that may have been good sales-but not for someone who was capable of selling much much greater. Parker set that in motion long before 1970-He cared little of song quality, content, or growth and did not incourage any.(IMO opinion he discouraged any)
But I think that if Elvis had lived his recording career would have been headed more into the country rock area-simply because that was where he picked a good portions of his songs. The 1950s rock sound he exploded with sounded more in line with 1970s country rock. The songs you mention were not at all uncontemporary sounding on the country and country rock side of music. Elvis produced the Elvis sound, I mean I could not imagine Elvis doing a serious disco album and that was where pop rock was headed in 1977. He was a southern man who loved all music but IMO country rock was the sound he had in the 1970s on most of his albums. He may have felt a little silly looking for hard rock songs in the 70s-rock music was still thought of as "teenager music" then (where as now 31 years since he died- if say Paul McCartney or Bob Dylan has a hit song or album in their 60s, no one thinks twice about it)
Finally we have to remember whichgever way you look at it -good or bad -Elvis sang many many styles thats what made him ELVIS. He listened to the Metropolitan Opera, and the Grand Old Opry-Dean Martin and Big Mama Thornton,- Eddy Arnold and BB King. He liked doing things he heard by other, he liked putting his stamp on songs that inspired him or touched him.
The trick would have been to allow people around him who could have inspired and challanged him so that when he did record he felt more comfortable trying to produce-rather than reproduce. If that makes sense.:blush:

medleyofcostumes
09-24-2008, 11:32 AM
Agreed KPM, Elvis doing an all out disco album - I don't see it. Elvis could have stood congtemporary without losing his identity. Some recordings of the 70's showed that he could and did - My boy, Good time Charlie's got the blues, It's midnight, all Tony Joe Whites stuff - he made them his own.

A drawback for Elvis was that he was no songwriter. He had to depend on everyone for everything (except his unique incredible voice).

Like all the artists who gained their fame in the Rock and Roll era, Elvis had to reinvent himself. Rock and roll was died by the early 1960's. I think it's a BIG shame that an artist of such vocal talent was guided / led by a group of individuals, management and others who eventually landed him in mediocrity - the priority was not the quality of the songs but who owned the royalties - unbelievable.

Many great atists changed management and almost all of them had an important upgrade in their carreers - Elton John, Queen and others. Why Elvis didn't realise or have the guts to do the same? I guess it was the country boy in him - Parker brought him to fame so he felt he owed it all to him.

Pacer72
09-24-2008, 04:59 PM
I much prefer Elvis in the '70's than any other period as he covered a wider scope of genres of music than anyone else in the '70's. Did Lennon or McCartney do gospal? Did Neil diamond do country? Did Dylan do rock n roll? Also, the '70's was the decade of singer/songwriter which Elvis didn't attempt, which is a shame as he could have been good at it. The medication Elvis was taking could well have helped produced an awesome self written album. Dylan, Neil Young, Lou Reed, David Bowie produced their best work on drugs in the '70's. I also thought Elvis was given songs to record and not have the freedom to pick what he wanted due to recording rights and costs, which is why he got so disillusioned with recording in the '70's?

Brian
09-24-2008, 10:06 PM
Actually that had happened long before the 70s-Col. Parker use to brag that there were a large enough group of hard core fans that Elvis would always sell a couple hundred thousand of any release, and that they would go to the movies. Which back then 200,000 for a run of the mill performer or group that may have been good sales-but not for someone who was capable of selling much much greater. Parker set that in motion long before 1970-He cared little of song quality, content, or growth and did not incourage any.(IMO opinion he discouraged any)
But I think that if Elvis had lived his recording career would have been headed more into the country rock area-simply because that was where he picked a good portions of his songs. The 1950s rock sound he exploded with sounded more in line with 1970s country rock. The songs you mention were not at all uncontemporary sounding on the country and country rock side of music. Elvis produced the Elvis sound, I mean I could not imagine Elvis doing a serious disco album and that was where pop rock was headed in 1977. He was a southern man who loved all music but IMO country rock was the sound he had in the 1970s on most of his albums. He may have felt a little silly looking for hard rock songs in the 70s-rock music was still thought of as "teenager music" then (where as now 31 years since he died- if say Paul McCartney or Bob Dylan has a hit song or album in their 60s, no one thinks twice about it)
Finally we have to remember whichgever way you look at it -good or bad -Elvis sang many many styles thats what made him ELVIS. He listened to the Metropolitan Opera, and the Grand Old Opry-Dean Martin and Big Mama Thornton,- Eddy Arnold and BB King. He liked doing things he heard by other, he liked putting his stamp on songs that inspired him or touched him.
The trick would have been to allow people around him who could have inspired and challanged him so that when he did record he felt more comfortable trying to produce-rather than reproduce. If that makes sense.:blush:

Back in the 50's and 60's as you know it was customary to release 3 albums as year as most other artists did.

In the 70's besides Elvis,Bowie,and John Denver RCA was a country label with many of there top country stars were putting out 2-3 albums a year just like Elvis as he was his most successful on the country charts.
RCA was also the worst of all the major labels imo as they signed Willie Nelson in the mid 60's but didn't develope him properly and he left where he eventually found success on Columbia. Waylon Jennings wanted to produce his own albums and record with his own band but had to fight RCA for years to be able to do that. RCA kicked Hank Snow out the door after he spent his entire career with them. RCA signed then red hot star Kenny Rogers to a huge Contract in the late 70's or Early 80's but dropped the ball with him and then in the late 90's signed hugely popular Nsync but they were ripping them off financially so Nsync sued them and signed with Jive, the list goes on and on there are rumors that Kelly Clarkson is unhappy with them.

I'ts interesting about Elvis going in the country rock direction as Elvis country rock was different to what became know as country rock as sung by Gram Parsons, personally I see Elvis continuing singing country and ballads and I also think he would have to get a good deal with another label in 1980 when his contract expired with say Columbia and then he would make mostly country albums.
As for Disco you never know Frank Sinatra did.

By the Way Led Zeppelin met Elvis in 1974 and I heard there was minimal talk of them writing, producing and playing on an Elvis album I know Elvis didn't like hard rock but maybe it would have been a good idea to shake things up and do something different as they were hugely popular and they were both blues fans and blues influenced. What do you think of Elvis doing an album with them?

Unchained Melody
09-24-2008, 10:41 PM
Elvis always acted on instict and recorded what he was feeling or what he could relate to at the time. Its no surprise the stuff he chose in the 70's was not the best, as he lost almost all interest in making new music in the end, heck, they couldn't even get him to the studio in the end of his life.