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presley31
05-29-2008, 08:26 PM
http://www.elvis.com.au/presley/interview_with_red_west.shtml

Not sure if this has been posted before:hmm:

Unchained Melody
05-29-2008, 09:40 PM
Bring out the knights in shining armor! :lol:

cameron
06-16-2008, 04:29 AM
http://www.elvis.com.au/presley/interview_with_red_west.shtml

Not sure if this has been posted before:hmm:
I just read this, Jen.IMO, this was a great interview !
I wish he'd did this a long time ago. I think Red did a much better interview than any of the others.

{No, I don't forgive him, because he never said he was sorry.
I never said what they wrote in EWH were lies . To me, it's just not something a friend would do..}

Getlo
06-16-2008, 04:36 AM
No, I don't forgive him

Neither you, nor anyone on here, has the right or privilege to "forgive" Red West, as he did nothing to you.

Neither you, nor anyone on here, has the right to bear a grudge or hold negative feelings towards anyone in the Elvis world because they did nothing to you.

Elvis would have been the first to forgive Red. You do not have that right.

cameron
06-16-2008, 04:41 AM
Neither you, nor anyone on here, has the right or privilege to "forgive" Red West, as he did nothing to you.

Neither you, nor anyone on here, has the right to bear a grudge or hold negative feelings towards anyone in the Elvis world because they did nothing to you.

Elvis would have been the first to forgive Red. You do not have that right.

I can do as I please. Same as anyone else ! ;)
I've never claimed to be as "forgiving" as Elvis.
It does get old having others put words into my mouth I never said!

presley31
06-16-2008, 08:41 AM
Nice interview by red.

cameron
06-16-2008, 08:51 AM
Nice interview by red.

I agree, Jen !! It's one I enjoyed over and above all others from that direction. ;)

ehollier
06-16-2008, 09:47 AM
Red West said in his interview that the book, Elvis, What Happened? contained 90% positive memories of his and Sonny's relationship with Elvis. I read this book very recently because I couldn't understand what all of the debate and controversy was about. I came to the conclusion that the book wasn't anything extraordinary but contained far more positive aspects of the relationship of Red, Sonny and Elvis than negative. The book certainly revealed some very unsavory stories that made me uncomfortable, but most of the book was positive and, at times, funny.

I believe that what made this book leave such a lasting negative impact on Elvis' fans and his legacy was its unfortunate timing of release. Had Elvis not died so close to its release, then maybe the book wouldn't have such a negative impression and would be remembered differently. However, Getlo pointed out in another thread, no one has come forward to discredit either Red or Sonny. Many, in fact, retell some of the same stories that are contained in Elvis, What Happened?, negative and postive.

We can only assume what Elvis 'would have done' had he lived longer. Some believe that he would have extended forgiveness to Red and Sonny. Some believe he would gotten the help he so desperately needed. Some believe that he would have outright denied any wrong doing. Some believe that he would have taken Red and Sonny back into the MM.

Whatever Elvis 'would have done', we will never really know. He wasn't, by all accounts, forthcoming with his innermost thoughts and feelings and the incredible quanties of drugs that he consumed, certainly impacted his, already complex, personality. I hate cliches, but history is what it is. It's not always perfect, it's not always pretty, it is just what it is.

CRITTERGITTER
06-16-2008, 10:23 AM
If that's loving someone, please don't love me. Red says there was no one and no where to put him to get help. So why did writing a book make sense. What did he expect to accomplish except to add to the stress of the situation.

As my friend Danny says, Not until Elvis himself comes and tells me to forgive him.

cameron
06-16-2008, 10:43 AM
Their words, " It was done out of bitterness and hurt."
Add to " We were broke." Toward the end; "we wanted to help Elvis."
I'm sure it was all of the above .

Although it's not nearly as bad as some think---IMO, it wasn't something I'd do for my best friend either ! :blink:

presley31
06-16-2008, 10:46 AM
I not going to put down anybody but writing a book couldn't save anybody. You can't help a man that doesn't want help.

utmom2008
06-16-2008, 11:00 AM
Red West said in his interview that the book, Elvis, What Happened? contained 90% positive memories of his and Sonny's relationship with Elvis. The book certainly revealed some very unsavory stories that made me uncomfortable, but most of the book was positive and, at times, funny.

I believe that what made this book leave such a lasting negative impact on Elvis' fans and his legacy was its unfortunate timing of release. Had Elvis not died so close to its release, then maybe the book wouldn't have such a negative impression and would be remembered differently.

We can only assume what Elvis 'would have done' had he lived longer. Some believe that he would have extended forgiveness to Red and Sonny. Some believe he would gotten the help he so desperately needed. Some believe that he would have outright denied any wrong doing. Some believe that he would have taken Red and Sonny back into the MM.

Whatever Elvis 'would have done', we will never really know. He wasn't, by all accounts, forthcoming with his innermost thoughts and feelings and the incredible quanties of drugs that he consumed, certainly impacted his, already complex, personality. I hate cliches, but history is what it is. It's not always perfect, it's not always pretty, it is just what it is.

We have Red West basically taking credit for the stories that are told in EWH. Then...there have been many times on this board that others speak out and say......Red and Sonny didn't really tell all of those things in that manner. The stories were embellished by Steve Dunleavy..... I bet at some point and time Dunleavy wants to just scream.:supriced::lol::supriced::lol: Who's story was it???? The West boys, or Dunleavy's???:hmm::hmm:
What many will NEVER understand about the book(though no fault of their own) is what times were like in 1977. YES...YES...YES, nowdays it's NO BIG DEAL. OK..we know that!! It was different then. I can not get on here and argue with people about what it was like to be a teenager in 1956...I don't know...I WAS NOT there. And...no, being 8 years old, 9, 10..whatever, is not the same thing as being an adult in 1977.:blink::blink::blink:

ehollier
06-16-2008, 11:12 AM
We have Red West basically taking credit for the stories that are told in EWH. Then...there have been many times on this board that others speak out and say......Red and Sonny didn't really tell all of those things in that manner. The stories were embellished by Steve Dunleavy..... I bet at some point and time Dunleavy wants to just scream.:supriced::lol::supriced::lol: Who's story was it???? The West boys, or Dunleavy's???:hmm::hmm:
What many will NEVER understand about the book(though no fault of their own) is what times were like in 1977. YES...YES...YES, nowdays it's NO BIG DEAL. OK..we know that!! It was different then. I can not get on here and argue with people about what it was like to be a teenager in 1956...I don't know...I WAS NOT there. And...no, being 8 years old, 9, 10..whatever, is not the same thing as being an adult in 1977.:blink::blink::blink:

I can't argue with you on this. The generations in which we grew up certainly have help shaped our view of history. That can be said of every generation. Because Elvis is such a passionate subject, he does not escape from such debate. I certainly respect your opinion that from an adult's standpoint in 1977 would differ greatly from a child's perspective in 1977.

utmom2008
06-16-2008, 11:16 AM
I can't argue with you on this. The generations in which we grew up certainly have help shaped our view of history. That can be said of every generation. Because Elvis is such a passionate subject, he does not escape from such debate. I certainly respect your opinion that from an adult's standpoint in 1977 would differ greatly from a child's perspective in 1977.

Thanks...I sure don't mean to put anyone down about that either. None of us can change our age(some try!!!) or the era that we came of age in. It's still hard for me to imagine why his "jiggling" was a big deal in 1956..:blink::blink:, but obviously, it was.:lol:

ehollier
06-16-2008, 11:20 AM
Thanks...I sure don't mean to put anyone down about that either. None of us can change our age(some try!!!) or the era that we came of age in. It's still hard for me to imagine why his "jiggling" was a big deal in 1956..:blink::blink:, but obviously, it was.:lol:

I don't have the answer to that, but he could sure turn it on when he got up there. :blush::blush::blush:

utmom2008
06-16-2008, 12:49 PM
I can't argue with you on this. The generations in which we grew up certainly have help shaped our view of history. That can be said of every generation. Because Elvis is such a passionate subject, he does not escape from such debate. I certainly respect your opinion that from an adult's standpoint in 1977 would differ greatly from a child's perspective in 1977.

I don't know what made me think of this, but it's a prime example of how different things were in the 70's. There was a new show on ABC which premiered in 1977 that was a HUGE hit, even though for the "times" it was considered very controversial. It was the first time that any of us really knew who Billy Crystal was. The show was called SOAP, and Billy Crystal's character was gay. The show really was funny....and everyone tuned in to watch it since having a gay character on TV was unchartered territory. Now that's how far things have come.:supriced::supriced::lol::lol:(y)

ehollier
06-16-2008, 12:54 PM
I don't know what made me think of this, but it's a prime example of how different things were in the 70's. There was a new show on ABC which premiered in 1977 that was a HUGE hit, even though for the "times" it was considered very controversial. It was the first time that any of us really knew who Billy Crystal was. The show was called SOAP, and Billy Crystal's character was gay. The show really was funny....and everyone tuned in to watch it since having a gay character on TV was unchartered territory. Now that's how far things have come.:supriced::supriced::lol::lol:(y)

I remember that show, but my parents wouldn't let me watch it. It was very 'mature' audiences which my adults and not something for a 10 or 11 year old.

utmom2008
06-16-2008, 12:57 PM
I remember that show, but my parents wouldn't let me watch it. It was very 'mature' audiences which my adults and not something for a 10 or 11 year old.

:lol::lol: That's just what I mean. I saw an old episode not long ago on some channel...and the only risque thing about it was using the word "gay". Now we have gay characters actually kissing on ABC's daytime TV.:D:blink::D

presley31
06-16-2008, 01:03 PM
:lol::lol: That's just what I mean. I saw an old episode not long ago on some channel...and the only risque thing about it was using the word "gay". Now we have gay characters actually kissing on ABC's daytime TV.:D:blink::D

yes l noticed that too. As the world turns has gay guys on there kissing, kinda makes me want to change the channel, but to each is there own(not this girl)

utmom2008
06-16-2008, 01:08 PM
but to each is there own(not this girl)

Yes....I agree with you.(y) You may run into the same troubles that my niece does however. She has 4 year old twin boys...so they have LOTS of questions when they flip from BARNEY to that.:supriced::supriced::lol:

Diane
06-16-2008, 01:10 PM
The times from the 50's to the early 60's are almost totally opposite of what they are today.

Okay, I was 11 going on 12 in 1956 when I first heard Elvis on the radio. I had an older cousin in her late teens that had just moved to New York City and she called her mother who was my mother's sister and told her to tell my mother to keep me far away from anything Elvis that he was considered to be a very bad influence on teenagers. In her words, a really bad guy!

Lucky for me my mother thought he was cute and couldn't anything wrong with him so I was allowed to buy his records, magazines with his picture etc. but I was never able to bring records to my aunt's and play them. I tried with my first 45 of Jailhouse Rock a few years later and was told I had to take that out of the house. Soooo apparently that notion of Elvis being not a nice guy hung around for quite a few years......and I ignored it the whole time. I'm still patting myself on the back and blessing my mother. :D

One of my fondest memories of mum was when she came into the living room one day while I was playing "It's Now or Never" and she said "wow, Elvis really does have a beautiful voice!"

My aunt's son who is a day older than myself was always more of a brother than a cousin had never been an Elvis fan and it is the one thing we were never able to share....even to this day but at least he gave up trying to change my mind years ago.:)

Diane

ehollier
06-16-2008, 01:11 PM
:lol::lol: That's just what I mean. I saw an old episode not long ago on some channel...and the only risque thing about it was using the word "gay". Now we have gay characters actually kissing on ABC's daytime TV.:D:blink::D

Try and imagine in the 1950's watching Frank Sinatra or Dean Martin doing their thing and then here comes Elvis 'jiggling' or moving around on stage to some strange, never before heard of music with an odd beat and sexy sneer and wild clothes!!!!! My mom (she's 60 yrs old) said that her mom wouldn't allow her to see his movies at the theater. I mean, how risque was Love Me Tender???

Different generations. I wouldn't necessarily agree that its looser morals, but rather a different tolerance of what we are willing accept (this may not be the best way to express this last sentence). Because I feel differently about the whole bodyguard book, doesn't mean that I have looser morals. I think it really says that I didn't have the opportunity to live as an adult in 1977 and couldn't experience the same feelings that you did surrounding the exaspiration of the book and Elvis' death weeks later. We are from different generations so we can't be expected to feel that same way.

utmom2008
06-16-2008, 01:28 PM
I mean, how risque was Love Me Tender???

Different generations. I wouldn't necessarily agree that its looser morals, but rather a different tolerance of what we are willing accept (this may not be the best way to express this last sentence). Because I feel differently about the whole bodyguard book, doesn't mean that I have looser morals. I think it really says that I didn't have the opportunity to live as an adult in 1977 and couldn't experience the same feelings that you did surrounding the exaspiration of the book and Elvis' death weeks later. We are from different generations so we can't be expected to feel that same way.

Actually Elizabeth, I think you said that very well. As I have said on here before.....there were things that college kids were doing in the 70's that are NO different than what college kids are doing today. The morals were/are the same...it's how the public perceives it. I had a friend in college that had a long-time boyfriend from Mississippi...he would come to Dallas to see her and they would stay at the Holiday Inn together.:supriced::supriced::supriced::supriced: We would have to chase her down to find her and tell her that her Mom was on her way to the dorm.:lmfao::lmfao::lmfao: That is NOT the way kids today would handle it.:lmfao::lmfao::lmfao:

ehollier
06-16-2008, 01:33 PM
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Actually Elizabeth, I think you said that very well. As I have said on here before.....there were things that college kids were doing in the 70's that are NO different than what college kids are doing today. The morals were/are the same...it's how the public perceives it. I had a friend in college that had a long-time boyfriend from Mississippi...he would come to Dallas to see her and they would stay at the Holiday Inn together.:supriced::supriced::supriced::supriced: We would have to chase her down to find her and tell her that her Mom was on her way to the dorm.:lmfao::lmfao::lmfao: That is NOT the way kids today would handle it.:lmfao::lmfao::lmfao:

You know what Rosanne, after reading and debating this, I also believe that (at least in the U.S.), that politics also plays alot into what we are willing to 'tolerate' and what is publically acceptable, just like what we watch on television or read in the press. But this is not the forum to debate politics, especially politics in the U.S. We get enough press time and criticism without bring it here.

presley31
06-16-2008, 02:19 PM
The times from the 50's to the early 60's are almost totally opposite of what they are today.

Okay, I was 11 going on 12 in 1956 when I first heard Elvis on the radio. I had an older cousin in her late twenties that had just moved to New York City and she called her mother who was my mother's sister and told her to tell my mother to keep me far away from anything Elvis that he was considered to be a very bad influence on teenagers. In her words, a really bad guy!
Lucky for me my mother thought he was cute and couldn't anything wrong with him so I was allowed to buy his records, magazines with his picture etc. but I was never able to bring records to my aunt's and play them. I tried with my first 45 of Jailhouse Rock a few years later and was told I had to take that out of the house. Soooo apparently that notion of Elvis being not a nice guy hung around for quite a few years......and I ignored it the whole time. I'm still patting myself on the back and blessing my mother. :D

One of my fondest memories of mum was when she came into the living room one day while I was playing "It's Now or Never" and she said "wow, Elvis really does have a beautiful voice!"

My aunt's son who is a day older than myself was always more of a brother than a cousin had never been an Elvis fan and it is the one thing we were never able to share....even to this day but at least he gave up trying to change my mind years ago.:)

Diane

i agree diane, my gramma said elvis was a ditry dancer back than and used to drive the girls mad, but my mom wasn't really allowed to watch elvis cause of the way he moved, but IMO elvis was tame prepared to now:blink:

SweetCaroline
06-16-2008, 02:40 PM
My parents thought ELVIS was a puzzlement in 56 (when I was nine)...but they never ever tried to stop me from liking ELVIS or buying his music....and it was my grandma who took me downtown on the bus to see the opening of "Love Me Tender". The adults around me could not have stopped me liking ELVIS if they tried!!! :lmfao:...but I am glad they didn't try. (y) The teasing they gave me for my affection for ELVIS was a big enough battle.:mad:

Elvistcbkirch
06-16-2008, 02:48 PM
Neither you, nor anyone on here, has the right or privilege to "forgive" Red West, as he did nothing to you.

Neither you, nor anyone on here, has the right to bear a grudge or hold negative feelings towards anyone in the Elvis world because they did nothing to you.

Elvis would have been the first to forgive Red. You do not have that right.

I absolutely agree...Bravo!

utmom2008
06-16-2008, 03:02 PM
I don't know what made me think of this, but it's a prime example of how different things were in the 70's. There was a new show on ABC which premiered in 1977 that was a HUGE hit, even though for the "times" it was considered very controversial. It was the first time that any of us really knew who Billy Crystal was. The show was called SOAP, and Billy Crystal's character was gay. The show really was funny....and everyone tuned in to watch it since having a gay character on TV was unchartered territory. Now that's how far things have come.:supriced::supriced::lol::lol:(y)


I remember that show, but my parents wouldn't let me watch it. It was very 'mature' audiences which my adults and not something for a 10 or 11 year old.

I read a little bit this afternoon about SOAP, I got to thinking back on it and remembered how funny it was. Before it premiered on ABC for the 77-78 season ABC had already gotten 32,000 letters about it...of which only 9 were in support of it. Many affiliates were picketed, causing some to NOT show it all and some to air it in a very late time slot. Bear in mind.......this was all taking place AFTER August 16, 1977. Yes,times were..different!:blink::blink::blink: